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Teach English in Iceland: Requirements, Salary, Jobs

English teaching jobs in Iceland

Teach English in Iceland

There are many reasons why someone might choose to teach English in Iceland. Here are a few potential benefits:

  • Unique cultural experience: Iceland is a small, isolated island nation with a rich cultural heritage and a unique way of life. Teaching English in Iceland can provide an opportunity to learn about and immerse yourself in Icelandic culture.

  • Strong demand for English: English is widely spoken in Iceland and is considered the country's second language. As such, there is a high demand for English teachers in Iceland, both in schools and in private language institutes.

  • High standard of living: Iceland has a high standard of living, with a strong social welfare system and a low crime rate. It is a safe and comfortable place to live and work.

  • Beautiful natural surroundings: Iceland is known for its stunning natural beauty, with glaciers, waterfalls, hot springs, and volcanic landscapes. It is a great place to explore and enjoy the outdoors.

  • Professional development opportunities: Teaching English in Iceland can be a great opportunity to develop your teaching skills and gain international experience. It can also be a stepping stone to further opportunities in education or other fields.

What are the requirements to teach English in Iceland?

The requirements to teach English in Iceland may vary depending on the specific job or institution. However, here are some general requirements you might expect to see:

  • English language proficiency: You will need to be proficient in English, as you will be teaching it to others. Most jobs will require a high level of English language proficiency, such as an advanced level of proficiency on the TOEFL or IELTS exams.

  • Teaching qualification: Many jobs in Iceland will require you to have a teaching qualification, such as a teaching certificate or a degree in education. Some jobs may also require you to have experience teaching English as a second language (ESL).

  • Legal work status: In order to work in Iceland, you will need to have a legal work status, such as a work visa or a residence permit. Obtaining these documents may require you to meet certain requirements, such as having a job offer or fulfilling certain financial or educational criteria.

  • Cultural sensitivity: As a teacher, it is important to be culturally sensitive and open to learning about new cultures. Being able to adapt to the Icelandic culture and teaching style will be important for success in the role.

  • Flexibility and adaptability: Teaching can be a challenging but rewarding career, and it requires a high degree of flexibility and adaptability. You will need to be able to work with a variety of students with different learning styles and needs, and be able to adapt your teaching methods as needed.

What salary can you earn as an English teacher in Iceland?

The salary you can earn as an English teacher in Iceland will depend on a variety of factors, including your qualifications, experience, and the specific job or institution you are working for. However, here are some general guidelines:

  • Entry-level positions: If you are just starting out as an English teacher in Iceland and have limited qualifications or experience, you can expect to earn a lower salary. Entry-level positions might pay between 250,000 and 300,000 Icelandic kronur (ISK) per month, which is equivalent to approximately $2,000-$2,500 USD at current exchange rates.

  • Experienced teachers: If you have more experience and/or advanced qualifications, you may be able to earn a higher salary as an English teacher in Iceland. Experienced teachers might earn between 350,000 and 450,000 ISK per month, which is equivalent to approximately $2,800-$3,600 USD at current exchange rates.

  • Private language institutes: Private language institutes may offer higher salaries to attract experienced and qualified teachers. Depending on the institution and your qualifications, you could earn between 500,000 and 600,000 ISK per month, which is equivalent to approximately $4,000-$4,800 USD at current exchange rates.

It's worth noting that salaries in Iceland tend to be higher compared to other countries, due to the country's high standard of living. However, the cost of living in Iceland is also relatively high, so it's important to consider this when evaluating potential salaries.

What is the cost of living in Iceland?

The cost of living in Iceland is relatively high compared to other countries. According to Numbeo, a website that compares the cost of living in cities around the world, the cost of living in Reykjavik, Iceland's capital city, is higher than the cost of living in major cities such as London, New York, and Paris.

Here are some estimates of the cost of living in Iceland:

  • Rent: The cost of rent in Iceland can vary depending on the location and size of the apartment. In Reykjavik, you can expect to pay between 120,000 and 250,000 ISK per month for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center, which is equivalent to approximately $960-$2,000 USD at current exchange rates.

  • Groceries: The cost of groceries in Iceland is relatively high compared to other countries. A basket of basic grocery items, such as bread, milk, eggs, and fruit, can cost between 5,000 and 10,000 ISK, which is equivalent to approximately $40-$80 USD at current exchange rates.

  • Transportation: Public transportation in Iceland is relatively expensive. A single bus ticket in Reykjavik costs around 1,500 ISK, or approximately $12 USD, and a monthly pass costs around 9,000 ISK, or approximately $72 USD.

  • Entertainment: The cost of entertainment in Iceland can vary depending on your interests. A movie ticket costs around 2,000 ISK, or approximately $16 USD, and a meal at a mid-range restaurant costs around 7,000 ISK, or approximately $56 USD.

It's worth noting that these estimates are just rough guidelines, and the actual cost of living in Iceland will depend on your individual circumstances and lifestyle.

The best places to teach English In Iceland

There are many places in Iceland where you could teach English, as the demand for English teachers is strong throughout the country. Here are some of the best places to consider:

  • Reykjavik: Reykjavik is the capital and largest city in Iceland, and it is home to a large number of schools and private language institutes that hire English teachers. Reykjavik is a vibrant and cosmopolitan city with a thriving arts and culture scene, and it is a great place to live and work.

  • Akureyri: Akureyri is the second-largest city in Iceland and is located in the north of the country. It is a popular tourist destination and has a number of schools and language institutes that hire English teachers. Akureyri is known for its stunning natural surroundings and is a great place for outdoor enthusiasts.

  • Keflavik: Keflavik is a small town located in the southwest of Iceland, near the international airport. It is home to the NATO base in Iceland and has a number of schools and language institutes that hire English teachers. Keflavik is a convenient place to live if you are planning to travel to other countries during your time in Iceland.

  • Other smaller towns: Iceland has a number of smaller towns and villages that may also have opportunities for English teachers. These towns may offer a more laid-back and rural way of life, and can be a good option if you are looking for a more intimate and close-knit community.

Ultimately, the best place to teach English in Iceland will depend on your personal preferences and needs. It's worth considering factors such as the size of the city, the availability of job opportunities, and the cost of living when deciding where to teach in Iceland.

Living in Iceland

Living in Iceland can be a unique and rewarding experience, as the country is known for its rich cultural heritage, stunning natural surroundings, and high standard of living. Here are a few things to consider if you are thinking about living in Iceland:

  • Climate: Iceland has a cool maritime climate, with cold winters and cool summers. The average temperature in Reykjavik, the capital city, is around 3-7°C (37-45°F) in the winter and around 10-14°C (50-57°F) in the summer. Make sure to bring warm clothing if you plan to live in Iceland, as it can get quite chilly, especially in the winter.

  • Housing: The cost of housing in Iceland is relatively high, especially in the capital city of Reykjavik. Rent prices can vary depending on the location and size of the apartment. It is common to find furnished apartments in Iceland, but you may also have to pay extra for utilities, such as electricity and heating.

  • Healthcare: Iceland has a high-quality healthcare system, and all citizens and legal residents are entitled to free healthcare. If you are living in Iceland, you will need to register with the Icelandic Health Insurance (IHI) to access healthcare services.

  • Transportation: Iceland has a well-developed transportation system, with buses and taxis available in most cities and towns. It is also possible to rent a car or buy a car in Iceland, although the cost of owning a car can be high due to high fuel prices.

  • Language: The official language of Iceland is Icelandic, which is a Scandinavian language with a unique alphabet and grammar. Many Icelanders also speak English, especially in the larger cities, and it is possible to get by with just English in many parts of the country. However, learning some basic Icelandic can be helpful for integrating into the local community and making the most of your time in Iceland.

Some facts About Iceland

Here are some facts about Iceland:

  • Iceland is a country located in the North Atlantic Ocean, just south of the Arctic Circle. It is the westernmost country of Europe and is bordered by the Greenland Sea to the west and the Atlantic Ocean to the south and east.

  • The official language of Iceland is Icelandic, which is a member of the Germanic language family.

  • The population of Iceland is about 364,000 people. The majority of the population is Icelandic, but there are also significant minority groups of immigrants and descendants of immigrants from various countries.

  • The capital and largest city of Iceland is Reykjavík.

  • The currency of Iceland is the Icelandic Krona.

  • Iceland has a mixed economy that includes elements of both a market economy and a welfare state. The country is known for its strong fishing and tourism industries, as well as its production of aluminum and silicon.

  • Iceland is a parliamentary republic, with a president as the head of state and a prime minister as the head of government.

  • Iceland is a member of the United Nations and the European Free Trade Association (EFTA). It is also a member of the Nordic Council and a candidate for membership in the European Union.

  • Iceland has a rich cultural history, with influences from its Norse, Celtic, and Gaelic past. The country is known for its literature, music, and traditional handicrafts.

  • Iceland is home to a number of natural attractions, including the Golden Circle, the Vatnajökull National Park, and the Geysir Geothermal Area. The country is also known for its volcanoes, geysers, and hot springs.